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John M. Flaxman Library SAIC School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Information Literacy at SAIC

The John M. Flaxman Library provides services that enable our community members to be effective scholars and critical users of information; who can apply their knowledge to their artistic, academic, and lifelong endeavors. This includes:

  • Creating an inclusive and equitable space for student + faculty learning
  • Aligning our instructional services with the school-wide learning goals
  • Growing our collections to include diverse voices within art + design
  • Collaborating with faculty in the classroom via instructional planning
  • Working across departments to support academic integrity and critical literacy

Our approach focuses on information literacies from the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy which states:
         “Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.” 

Utilizing other frameworks such as the Inclusive Pedagogy Framework + Pedagogy of Vulnerability, we carefully consider our choices around both the content we teach and the means through which we deliver it. Additionally, we believe that the social identities of both student and teacher have a direct impact on the learning experience. 
              “Inclusive learning and teaching in higher education refers to the ways in which pedagogy, curricula, and assessment are designed to engage students in learning that is meaningful, relevant, and accessible to all. It embraces a view of the individual and individual difference as the source of diversity that can enrich the lives and learning of others.” (Hockings, 2010)